Jung and Shiva: Phallic and Feminine

This workshop brings together opposite ways of thinking-Shiva’s form and Jung’s inclusiveness and curiosity about the world.

Carl Gustav Jung

C.G.Jung, a famous psychologist from the West was one of a very few handful of thinkers who took interest in the Eastern part of the world and how this world managed the psyche. He visited India and discovered the Stupas and mandalas. He was also fascinated by the idea of how India manages sexuality in its mythology. Shiva on the other hand, is a mythological being, more popularly known in the western world as a god of destruction. This is a somewhat narrow definition. In Asia, Shiva is an all purpose god-known in many avatars (roles) and his form binds opposite, paradoxical functions-creativity and destruction, saving and destroying. This workshop brings together opposite ways of thinking-Shiva’s form and Jung’s inclusiveness and curiosity about the world.

Rock cut Elephanta cave sculpture of
Ardhnareshwar-half man/woman

This will be an exciting day using creativity and dance to explore the struggle to understand oneself better outside the social restrictions to be under one label or box in terms of gender, sexuality, race and culture.

It will also explore the idea of the interchangeability between masculine and feminine. Shiva for eg, took a form called Ardhnareshwar (half man/woman). Jung on the other hand, explored the concept of masculine and feminine in more depth and sensitivity than any psychologist of the time.

Shankar or Shiva

Through a lively atmosphere which contains a live dance element, the workshop hopes to release some of the repressed vitality in our dissociated/split off ‘avatars’. The dancer will be Kali Chadrasegaram.