Psychoanalytic Therapy Evidence?

Psychoanalytic based treatments are evidence-based forms of therapy which can effectively treat emotional problems and a wide range of mental health conditions such as depression, eating disorders and anxiety.

Psychoanalysis started with the discoveries of Sigmund Freud a century ago, but its methods have changed and developed a great deal since then. It has the most developed theoretical base of all the talking treatments and has had a significant influence on all talking treatments.

Psychoanalytic therapies involve talking to a trained therapist, usually one-to-one, but sometimes in a group or with a partner or family members. This kind of therapy addresses underlying issues and causes, often from your past, which may be concerning you, or affecting your relationships with others. In your sessions you will be encouraged to talk freely and to look deeper into your problems and worries. It differs from many other talking therapies in that it aims to help people make deep seated change in personality and emotional development, alongside relieving troubling symptoms. It can help you discuss feelings you have about yourself and other people, particularly family and those close to you.

Some people seek help for specific reasons, such as eating disorders, psycho-somatic conditions, obsessional behaviour, or phobic anxieties. Some seek help for underlying feelings of depression or anxiety, difficulties in concentrating, dissatisfaction in work or in marriage, or for an inability to form satisfactory relationships. It may benefit anyone. It can help children and adolescents who have emotional and behavioural difficulties which are evident at home or school, like personality problems, depression, learning difficulties, school phobias, eating or sleeping disorders.

Read more : https://www.bpc.org.uk/information-support/what-is-therapy/

Is Psychoanalytic Therapy useful ?

Was I mentally ill? I suppose I was, though the first time someone in my family used the phrase “verge of a nervous breakdown”, or something like it, I was taken aback. Probably I was about as far from well as it was possible to be while still going about my business: essays, lectures, friends and so forth (I was a student at the time). A broken heart – that, is, a rejection so disappointing I couldn’t bring myself to accept it – was the trigger. But it brought up all manner of shit. By the time I went to talk to a psychoanalyst, I had feelings so muddled that sharing them with anyone else would have been weird.‘After, I feel ecstatic and emotional’: could virtual reality replace therapy?Read more Eight months later, the shrink and I had somehow decided that once a week wasn’t enough, and I signed up for the full whack: 50 minutes five times a week. This was cut down to four, but I carried on going until I was 26. It was a huge help. I know lots of people who see, or have seen, a psychotherapist or counsellor of some sort, but hardly anyone has psychoanalysis. Literally, hardly anyone. There are no official figures, but I’d be surprised if there are more than 500 people in the UK currently “in analysis”, or intensive psychotherapy, by which I mean appointments at least three times a week. There are loads of good reasons for this. Non-neurotic, uninhibited people who cope well with life – family, work, money, sex, food, other people – don’t need any help. (Well done, those people.) But plenty of others, for reasons that range from obvious to unfathomable, don’t manage all that well. Some of those become ill, and mess up their lives and other people’s as a result. I think shrinks could help many of these people. Everyone should have psychoanalysis – that is, the chance to dig into their past and reflect critically on their personality, helped by a professional – if they want it.
A government-funded study found it to be as effective as psychiatry and CBT at treating depressed adolescents
It doesn’t have to be five times a week in a private consulting room, either. Fiercely divided in their views of human nature, psychoanalysts also disagree about what psychoanalysis actually is: just how much time and money do you have to spend on the couch for it to count? But in the real world, including in the cash-strapped NHS, therapists have developed a variety of ways of working (once a week, therapy groups and so on) that don’t take years and cost the earth. Grouped under the broad heading psychodynamic – which refers to the idea, derived from Freud but with many twists and turns since, that human beings have unconscious as well as conscious minds – their aim is to provide insight and relief from distress. The prospect of so much state-sanctioned soul-searching will send many, perhaps even most people, running for the gym, the medicine cabinet or the hills. After all, there are plenty of therapists out there and if more people wanted to employ their services then presumably they would. While there is reams of interesting anecdotal evidence about psychoanalysis, not to mention The Sopranos, clinical trials have been thin on the ground. That is changing and a recent UK government-funded study found it to be as effective as psychiatry and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) at treating depressed adolescents. Read more : https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/oct/09/access-psychoanalysis-help-mental-illness

How Psychoanalysis influenced the field of Psychology

Psychoanalysis is defined as a set of psychological theories and therapeutic techniques that have their origin in the work and theories of Sigmund Freud. The core of psychoanalysis is the belief that all people possess unconscious thoughts, feelings, desires, and memories.

Psychoanalysis suggests that people can experience catharsis and gain insight into their current state of mind by bringing the content of the unconscious into conscious awareness. Through this process, a person can find relief from psychological distress. Psychoanalysis also suggests that:

  • A person’s behavior is influenced by their unconscious drives.
  • Emotional and psychological problems such as depression and anxiety are often rooted in conflicts between the conscious and unconscious mind.
  • Personality development is heavily influenced by the events of early childhood (Freud suggested that personality was largely set in stone by the age of five).
  • People use defense mechanisms to protect themselves from information contained in the unconscious.
  • Skilled analysts can help a person bring certain aspects of their unconscious mind into their conscious awareness by using psychoanalytic strategies such as dream analysis and free association.

Read more : https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-psychoanalysis-2795246

Sticking plaster over a deep wound

Listen to the BBC Radio 4 coverage of the joint BPC & UKCP survey on quality psychotherapy services in the NHS, published earlier this year 

Service user Louisa, shares her experience of psychotherapy services, both in the NHS and privately, poignantly describing lower intensity treatments as a sticking plaster over a deep wound and that psychoanalysis gave her a language for the things that she couldn’t speak of before. here

Valued psychotherapy and counselling services are currently facing closure, threats of closure or various forms of downgrading. Some of these are psychoanalytically-based but the cuts are being experienced across the board.

A survey of over 800 members of the British Psychoanalytic Council and the UK Council for Psychotherapy working in the NHS found that in the last year there has been:

Increased negative outcomes for clients:

  • 77% of therapists reported negative outcomes for clients as a result of cuts to psychotherapy services such as longer waiting lists, premature ending of treatment and reduced choices around therapy types.
  • Therapists reported that waiting too long for therapy or getting the wrong type of therapy or not enough of the right type could lead to increases in clinical symptoms.

Greater need but fewer services:

  • Over two thirds (68%) reported that they are being relied upon to deal with increasingly complex cases.
  • But at the same time there is an increasing pressure to use much shorter term (CBT informed) interventions that are not suitable for all clients.
  • Fewer psychotherapy services are being commissioned (48% noted decreases in the number of psychotherapy services commissioned, with only 5% reporting increases). 63% of therapists reported decreases in the number of psychotherapy posts.

See the summary findings of the joint survey on the BPC site : here

Why TherapyFriends?

I thought I would pen a few lines for those who are wondering if I have gone ‘off’ and created TherapyFriends and whether this means I don’t practise as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist.

I do practise as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist. I am rooted in it and in fact, TherapyFriends demonstrates this amply. It hopes to circumvent the over interference of the superego and create a space for all of us neurotics!

If this means I am ‘off’ to some, I will further argue, that actually I am ‘on’ and able to embrace my neurosis and therefore, open to the neurosis of others.

I used to work in print and television before and in a way, TF brings together my past and present professional life.

Anxiety Symptoms?

The Clinical Symptomatology of Anxiety Neurosis. This list is compiled from – Freud,S. (1925-26). In Vol.10, Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety. P.94-97.

The first person account, the ‘I’, mentioned at times in the list is Freud’s voice.

 The clinical picture of anxiety neurosis comprises the following symptoms:

 

  1. General irritability. Common nervous symptom. “Increased irritability always points to anaccumulation of excitation or an inability to tolerate such an accumulation-that is, to an absolute or a relative accumulation of excitation. One manifestation of this increased irritability seems to me to deserve special mention; I refer to auditory hyperaesthesia , to an oversensitiveness to noise-a symptom which is undoubtedly to be explained by the innate intimate relationship between auditory impressions and fright. Auditory hyperaesthesia frequently turns out to be a cause of sleeplessness, of which more than one form belongs to anxiety neurosis”.
  2. Anxious

“Anxious expectation, of course, shades off imperceptibly into normal anxiety, comprising all that is ordinarily spoken of as anxiousness–or a tendency to take a pessimistic view of things; but at every opportunity it goes beyond a plausible anxiousness of this kind , and it is frequently recognized by thepatient himself as a kind of compulsion. For one form of anxious expectation -that relating to the subject’s own health-we may reserve the old term  hypochondria.

A further expression of anxious expectation is to be found in the inclination to moral anxiety, to scrupulousness and pedantry.

Anxiousness-which, though mostly latent as regards consciousness, is constantly lurking in the background-has other means of finding expression besides this. It can suddenly break through into consciousness without being aroused by a train of ideas, and thus provoke an anxiety attack. finally, the feeling of anxiety may have linked to it a disturbance of one or more of the

 

bodily functions-such as respiration, heart action, vasomotor innervation or glandular activity. the feelingof anxiety often recedes into the background or is referred to quite unrecognizably as ‘being unwell’ ‘feeling uncomfortable’ and so on.

  • Anxiety attacks accompanied by disturbances of the heart action, such as palpitation, either with transitory arrhythmia or with tachycardia o longer duration which may end in serious weakness of the heart and which is not always easily differentiated from organic heart affection; and, again, pseudo­ angina pectoris-diagnostically a delicate subject!
  • Anxiety attacks accompanied by disturbances of respiration , several forms of nervous dyspnoea, attacks resembling asthma, and the like. I would emphasize that even these attacks are not alwaysaccompanied by recognizable anxiety.
  • Attacks of sweating, often at
  • Attacks of tremor and shivering which are only too easily confused with hysterical
  • Attacks of ravenous hunger, often accompanied by
  • Diarrhoea coming on in
  • Attacks of locomotor vertigo.
  • Attacks of what are known as congestions, including practically everything that has been termed vasomotor
  • Attacks of (But these seldom occur without anxiety or a similar feeling ofdiscomfort.)
  1. Waking up at night in a fright (the pavor nocturnus of adults), which is usually combined with anxiety, dyspnoea , sweating and so on, is very often nothing else than a variant of the anxiety But thepavor can also emerge in a pure form, without any dream or recurring hallucination.
  2. Vertigo’ occupies a prominent place in the group of symptoms of anxiety neurosis. In its mildest form it is best described as ‘giddiness’; in its severer

 

manifestations, as ‘attacks of vertigo'(with or without anxiety), it must be classed among the gravest symptoms of the neurosis.

Furthermore, I am not sure whether it is not also right to recognize alongside of this a vertigo a stomacho laeso [of gastric origin].

  1. On the basis of chronic anxiousness (anxious expectation) on the one hand, and a tendency to anxiety attacks accompanied by vertigo on the other, two groups of typical phobias develop, the first relating to general physiological dangers, the second relating to locomotion. To the first group belong fear of snakes,thunderstorms, darkness, vermin, and so on, as well as the typical moral over-scrupulousness and forms ofdoubting mania . Here the available anxiety is simply employed to reinforce aversions which are instinctively implanted in everyone.

The other group includes agoraphobia with all its accessory forms, the whole of them characterized by their relation to locomotion.

  1. The digestive activities undergo only a few disturbances in anxiety neurosis; but these are characteristic Sensations such as an inclination to vomit and nausea are not rare, and the symptom of ravenous hunger may, by itself or in conjunction

with other symptoms (such as congestions), give rise to a rudimentary anxiety attack. As a chronic change, analogous to anxious expectation, we find an inclination to diarrhoea, and this has been the occasion of the strangest diagnostic errors.

The behaviour of the gastro-intestinal tract in anxiety neurosis presents a sharp contrast to the influenceof neurasthenia on those functions. Mixed cases often show the familiar ‘alternation between diarrhoea and constipation’. Analogous to this diarrhoea is the need to urinate that occurs in anxiety neurosis.

  1. The paraesthesias which may accompany attacks of vertigo or anxiety are interesting because they, like the sensations of the hysterical aura, become associated in a definite sequence; although I find that these

associations, in contrast to the hysterical ones, are atypical and changing. A further similarity to hysteria is provided by the fact that in anxiety neurosis a kind of conversion takes place on to bodily sensations, which may easily be overlooked-for instance, on to rheumatic muscles. A whole number of what are known as rheumatic individuals-who, moreover, can be shown to be rheumatic- are in reality suffering from anxiety neurosis.Along with this increase of sensitivity to pain, I have also observed in a number of cases of anxiety neurosis a tendency to hallucinations; and these could not be interpreted as hysterical.

  1. Several of the symptoms I have mentioned, which accompany or take the place of an anxiety attack, also appear in a chronic form. In that case they are still less easy to recognize, since the anxious sensationwhich goes with them is less clear than in an anxiety attack. This is especially true of diarrhoea, vertigo and paraesthesias (an abnormal sensation, typically tingling or pricking (‘pins and needles’), caused chiefly by pressure on or damage to peripheral nerves. Just as an attack of vertigo can be replaced by a fainting fit, so chronic vertigo can be replaced by a constant feeling of great feebleness, lassitude and so”

 

Anxiety – Symposium -BCAT

This event is now over. Thank you to all at BCAT for a wonderful morning!  Pleased about how it went-the facilitation by Nick Hall and the people I met.  

Saturday, March 20th 2021 –  Zoom

https://www.bcat-team.org.uk/training#SYMPOSIA

Anxiety Symposia with Smita Rajput Kamble

Anxiety affects daily life. Development and growth is that rare human achievement when we can overcome anxiety and it’s debilitating affects. This symposium will get to grips with understanding anxiety via a psychodynamic lens.

WHEN: Saturday 20th March, 2021 – 10am to 1 pm (with breaks).

WHERE: Online  COST: £60.

Payment:

You can pay by direct bank transfer to Coop Bank, sort code 089299, account no. 65682890, putting your own name as a reference and email us to say you have done this, or send a cheque payable to Bedford Counselling Centre to Bedford Counselling and Training, 71 Gwyn Street, Bedfordshire MK40 1HH.

Why do this workshop?
We experience anxiety and fear every day of our lives-whether it is about work, our health and safety and/or our relationships with others. Anxiety and generalised anxiety disorder almost always tops the chart of most browsed mental health subjects. This symposium will give you an in depth understanding of anxiety and its roots in guilt, hate and fear of castration. In the therapeutic space of group and individual work you will be able to understand how you as a practitioner help people manage their anxiety and begin to heal.

Aims

  1. To understand what is anxiety –its function in normal and abnormal conditions. The effect of fear and anxiety on possibilities of growth and development.
  2. The psychodynamic lens: pre-oedipal and oedipal anxiety. Klein and Freud on anxiety.
  3. To discuss how and why we help clients become less anxious and more contained.

Process for symposium

There will be a speaker presentation on the history of and psychodynamic theories about anxiety as well as examples of its presentation in the consulting room. The presentation will be followed by participant discussion. The speaker will then

facilitate pair and group work so that participants can apply theory to their own clinical practice examples.

Target Audience

This symposium is suitable for qualified and training psychodynamic psychotherapists, counsellors and mental health practitioners. The primary theoretical focus will be psychodynamic, but practitioners of other modalities are welcome to attend as long as they have made themselves familiar with some of the pre-course reading.

Smita Rajput Kamble 

Smita is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice. She is a training supervisor at Bedford Counselling

Foundation. In the past, she was one of the faculty at WPF Therapy, London Bridge where she taught the Advanced Clinical and Theoretical Issues seminar to Year 3 and 4 psychodynamic psychotherapy trainees. She also conducts CPD activities within the psychodynamic community in London.

*Please note that this symposium may either be held at the University of Bedfordshire in Bedford or on Zoom, depending on the state of Covid 19 restrictions by March.


CONTACT US TODAY TO BOOK A PLACE:
TEL: 01234 219905 – EMAIL: enquiries@bcat-team.org.uk
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