Anxiety -Symposium -BCAT

Thank you to all at BCAT for a wonderful morning!  Pleased about how it went-the facilitation by Nick Hall and the people I met.  

Saturday, March 20th 2021 –  Zoom

https://www.bcat-team.org.uk/training#SYMPOSIA

Anxiety Symposia with Smita Rajput Kamble

Anxiety affects daily life. Development and growth is that rare human achievement when we can overcome anxiety and it’s debilitating affects. This symposium will get to grips with understanding anxiety via a psychodynamic lens.

WHEN: Saturday 20th March, 2021 – 10am to 1 pm (with breaks).

WHERE: Online  COST: £60.

Payment:

You can pay by direct bank transfer to Coop Bank, sort code 089299, account no. 65682890, putting your own name as a reference and email us to say you have done this, or send a cheque payable to Bedford Counselling Centre to Bedford Counselling and Training, 71 Gwyn Street, Bedfordshire MK40 1HH.

Why do this workshop?
We experience anxiety and fear every day of our lives-whether it is about work, our health and safety and/or our relationships with others. Anxiety and generalised anxiety disorder almost always tops the chart of most browsed mental health subjects. This symposium will give you an in depth understanding of anxiety and its roots in guilt, hate and fear of castration. In the therapeutic space of group and individual work you will be able to understand how you as a practitioner help people manage their anxiety and begin to heal.

Aims

  1. To understand what is anxiety –its function in normal and abnormal conditions. The effect of fear and anxiety on possibilities of growth and development.
  2. The psychodynamic lens: pre-oedipal and oedipal anxiety. Klein and Freud on anxiety.
  3. To discuss how and why we help clients become less anxious and more contained.

Process for symposium

There will be a speaker presentation on the history of and psychodynamic theories about anxiety as well as examples of its presentation in the consulting room. The presentation will be followed by participant discussion. The speaker will then

facilitate pair and group work so that participants can apply theory to their own clinical practice examples.

Target Audience

This symposium is suitable for qualified and training psychodynamic psychotherapists, counsellors and mental health practitioners. The primary theoretical focus will be psychodynamic, but practitioners of other modalities are welcome to attend as long as they have made themselves familiar with some of the pre-course reading.

Smita Rajput Kamble 

Smita is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice. She is a training supervisor at Bedford Counselling

Foundation. In the past, she was one of the faculty at WPF Therapy, London Bridge where she taught the Advanced Clinical and Theoretical Issues seminar to Year 3 and 4 psychodynamic psychotherapy trainees. She also conducts CPD activities within the psychodynamic community in London.

*Please note that this symposium may either be held at the University of Bedfordshire in Bedford or on Zoom, depending on the state of Covid 19 restrictions by March.


CONTACT US TODAY TO BOOK A PLACE:
TEL: 01234 219905 – EMAIL: enquiries@bcat-team.org.uk
Please email us if you are interested in receiving up to date information about our CPD programme, courses and conference and we will add you to our mailing list.

What is Trauma and How We Try to Master It


In one of his earliest essays, Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920), Sigmund Freud discusses the case of a boy, one and a half years old, who develops a game to deal with the trauma that he suffers for the first time when his mother, who he is very attached to, goes away for a prolonged visit and then returns.

He throws the ball over the bed and it goes out of sight. He makes a sound to show his surprise and wonder. After it is found and brought to him, he does an ‘ooo…’ in a delighted way.

Freud is promoting the theory that there is an economic motive involved-the need to restore ‘pleasure’ by which Freud means ‘equilibrium’ in the psychical system which has endured a sudden shock of not seeing his mother for an unpredictable time.

Sigmund Freud

This is how the game helps him to master the trauma of seperation and loss. Says Freud: “..At the outset, he (the boy) was in a passive situation-he was overpowered by the experience; but by repeating it, unpleasurable though it was, as a game, he took on the active part.” 

This observation -deduction has paved the way for the development of the idea of trauma. Not many credit Freud anymore. With new approaches, the original thinker is ‘deleted’. Do read his works. Elegant writer.

From this game, he also deduced that an object thrown away by this child is his/her way of mastering his anger, owning it. If you can imagine that the object/toy stands for mother or father or anyone who he/she is attached to and leaves unexpectedly, causing uncertainty and pain, a child can at least take it out on the object/toy and throw it away or break it. This little boy had heard that his father had to ‘go away to the front’ as it was war time. He would throw the object away and say, ‘go to the fwont!’ In this way, he was able to master, at least in his mind, a situation he had no control over-his father going to war, his mother leaving him for a visit.

Migration, Displacement, Stress

Increasingly, people find themselves having to migrate to other areas of the UK or from one country to another, in order to find jobs that are suitable for them. This migration has a history and goes back to the beginning of the human race and the wandering, nomad that some of us might identify within ourselves has long term ancestors.

Milton Keynes can feel ‘modern’ to the newcomer

Moving to a new city may be an exciting venture. Milton Keynes, for example, attracts quite a migrant population, not just from other countries but from different parts of the country. It has a good success rate in employment and seems on the surface to be a buzzing city with lots to offer to someone who is new here.

The underlying issues that accompany a migration is the loss of a secure base (if there was one before). However big the reward for such movements, the human cost is high. Separation and loss cause the human to regress to some of his/her earliest experiences of loss and the response to such losses.

Our infancy is like this pic. Someone familiar is ‘holding’ us

If you observe a baby who is still at the very earliest stages of life, the eyes constantly find its mother/caregiver because that is how he/she finds an emotional and psychic anchor in the aftermath of the loss of the womb life.

If you observe yourself in a new place, you may find yourself searching in a similar way for familiar things – a McDonalds’ sign, familiar landmarks, a nice smile from someone to make you feel welcome etc. I have often heard talk in the local gym of how friendly everyone is here and how they would not want to be in that other place where no one smiles at the other. 

These are the things which bring relief to the soul that searches for a home where it can feel safe. With the relative feelings of safety come the need to perform and make one’s mark on the environment. The healthy normal human will make a seemingly unfamiliar, even hostile environment into a place they begin to feel at home in.

An ethnic word can bring relief to the homesick

Some people may never make a new place their home because all the goodness is left behind in the place they left to come here.
This is called splitting and projecting goofy shopdness into an idealised place.
Such splitting can occur with people as well. You may often hear stories of how good the previous boyfriend/girlfriend/mother/father/brother/sister/teacher etc was and how no one can ever take their place now.

Such a splitting harms the experience of the present and the potential to live and enjoy something new in the present.

Counselling/therapy can help to work through the idealised lost experience of someone or something and open up the capacity to live life more deeply and fully.

But the bottomline sometimes is that no two things are the same and we, as living organisms, require some amount of sameness and familiarity in order to feel secure and grow. Letting go of things one cannot have anymore and ushering in the new is an art that may enrich one’s experience of life’s constantly changing parameters.

Depression-Not so Blue ?

The predominant medical view is that depression is a mental disorder and anti depressants and psychotherapy maybe prescribed to manage it.

Depression is characterised by sad mood, the inability to derive pleasure from activities such as seating or sex, and changes in psychomotor, sleeping, and eating patterns.

This may sound all doom and gloom but research is re-evaluating depression and asking some important questions. The unusually large numbers of people who now get diagnosed with depression leads to the question whether it is not a bit of over-diagnosis and can we step away from resorting to medication where possible.

Therapy seems to be a more healthy alternative and can be a good space to take inner rumination to, avoiding too much isolation.

According to an article in the American Psychological Review (2009) ‘The bright side of being blue: Depression as an Adaptation for Analyzing Complex Problems’, the authors (P.Andrews and A. Thomson Jr ) suggest that depression maybe a natural response to help an individual avoid outside stimulus and apply his/her mind to resolving complex inner problems.

They say, ‘Depression is the primary emotional condition for which help is sought. Depressed people often report persistent rumination, which involves analysis, and complex social problems in their lives.

Depressed people may withdraw into an internal state of preoccupation where they seem to ruminate. They may slowly isolate from others and insulate themselves from the outside world.

According to the article, ‘Analysis is often a useful approach for solving complex problems, but it requires slow, sustained processing, so disruption would interfere with problem solving.

The analytical rumination hypothesis proposes that depression is an evolved response to complex problems, whose function is to minimise disruption and sustain analysis of those problems by (a) giving the triggering problem prioritised access to processing resources, (b) reducing the desire to engage in distracting activities (anhedonia), and (c) producing psychomotor changes that reduce exposure to distracting stimuli.

In other words, the authors suggest that a certain amount of preoccupation and privacy may be required to think about and resolve life’s complex problems, whether it is at the workplace or in domestic life.

As a society we have ensured that workplace meetings be relatively without interruptions and have maximum privacy. This is to encourage a more focused and deeper thinking about workplace issues by avoiding all other distractions.

However, popular ideas which dictate how social and family life should be do not make space for such a condition. The sometimes stereotypical mingling with others is encouraged to fight what is considered an illness and anyone who wants to opt out maybe considered either ‘boring’, a misfit, unwell, antisocial or unpopular.

It is difficult to live with someone who is depressed. Family and close friends begin to feel the pinch of being with someone who is quite unavailable emotionally. They may experience useless, angry and pent up feelings.

According to the authors, depression as it is defined medically, is prevalent in industrialised societies where such a study was held but it also exists in small societies wherever it was possible to conduct such a study.

They go on to say ‘such evidence suggests that much of what is currently classified as depressive disorder represents normal psychological functioning (Horwitz & Wakefield, 2007).

One likely factor contributing to over-diagnosis is that clinically significant impairment is not conclusive evidence of disorder (Spitzer & Wakefield, 1999). Impairment can be caused by biological dysfunction, but it can also be caused by properly functioning stress response mechanisms.’

Though clinical and severe depression over a long period of time is not to be taken lightly, the usual bouts of milder depression maybe seen as a human and natural response to the need for resolving complex issues.

Anxiety ! Workshop

Anxiety and fear affect daily life. To say that we live in the grip of fear and anxiety and have brief phases of contentment and leisure, would not be an exaggeration. Development and growth are that great and rare human achievement in the face of such difficult and debilitating emotions. This workshop gets to grips with fear and anxiety, primal emotions, through a psychoanalytic lens. In the therapeutic space of group and individual work, you will be able to understand the enormity of the task you do as a human being and practitioner, in helping people manage their anxiety.

“While she was in a state of great anxiety, she had attempted to pray but could find no words. At last a few words of a child’s prayer in English occurred to her.” (p.10) – Josef Breuer and Sigmund Freud (1956). On the psychical mechanism of hysterical phenomena (1893) in International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 37:8-13.

“After all, the reason which brings patients into analysis is fundamentally that they cannot manage anxiety. Though it does not, of course, mean that the patient is consciously aware of this.” – Joseph, B.(1978). Different types of anxiety and their handling in the analytic situation in International Journal of Psycho-Analysis. 59: 223-228.

This workshop will help participants to understand anxiety as explained by psychoanalytic thinkers, and it’s function in normal and abnormal conditions. This workshop will cover the effect of fear and anxiety on possibilities of growth and development and understand how one helps/does not help clients become less anxious and more contained.

There will be a workshop leader presentation on anxiety and theory from a psychodynamic perspective, as well as clinical discussion of its presentation in the consulting room. This will include some exploration of anxiety both within a historical context and its modern manifestations. There will be a discussion of case studies and use of social dreaming exercises to explore anxiety. The workshop leader will also use clips from films to illustrate the material and ideas.

This workshop is suitable for qualified and training psychotherapists and counsellors and mental health practitioners. The primary theoretical focus of the workshop will be psychodynamic, but practitioners of other modalities are welcome to atten